Trump’s Faith In Military Does Not a Strategy Make

After five months in office, President Trump has still not articulated a strategy for the conflicts. That’s a greater cause for concern than how he chooses to delegate to a military for which he remains ultimately responsible, says political scientist Peter Feaver. “They haven’t figured out what their strategy is going to be, so there’s a cart-before-the-horse aspect,” says Feaver.

Read More in TIME

U.S. Climate Policy in the Trump Administration

In a newly released policy brief, law professor Jonathan Wiener, Kenan Institute for Ethics’ Rethinking Regulation co-director, provides context on the complex web of climate change policy, written for the Climate Economics Chair in Paris. Wiener’s essay covers a range of topics related to U.S. climate policies in the wake of President Trump’s decision to withdraw the country from the Paris Agreement on climate change.

Read More at Kenan Institute

The Hardest Part of Trump’s National Security Strategy to Write

Sometime this year, the Trump administration intends to release the legislatively mandated National Security Strategy (NSS). “… The very act of drafting the NSS serves as a (modest) disciplining device on an administration, obliging the team to confront hard truths about previous policy statements and efforts,” writes political scientist Peter Feaver. “Which brings me to the question I have been pondering for quite a while: how hard will it be for President Trump’s team to draft such an NSS? The answer I keep coming to is: pretty hard.”

 

Read More in Foreign Policy

Is Trump ‘Disrupting’ His Own Foreign-Policy Team?

“What’s unusual here is that the Trump team is facing this significant diplomatic challenge before they’ve got their roster on board,” says political scientist Peter Feaver. “It’s like attempting to do a difficult synchronized swimming maneuver, with half the team not yet in their bathing suits and others not even named to the team yet.”

Read More in The Christian Science Monitor

Can Sessions Discuss Conversations With President Trump?

“In terms of the law of executive privilege, it belongs to the president, and he has not asserted it. General Sessions sought to preserve the president’s ability to assert it, but that is not how it works,” says law professor Lisa Kern Griffin. “… The president could have instructed him not to answer any questions about their conversations because of executive privilege. That, apparently, did not happen, and no privilege was asserted.”

Read More in Vox

 

Russia Probe: Possible Explosive Moments

Investigators looking into whether Trump’s team worked with Russia to win the White House could go down a path defined by other showdowns, where there’s little history beyond Watergate or Monica Lewinsky to guide them. “A set of two precedents is not a big set of precedents,” says law professor Samuel Buell. “You also have to say whatever the Trump story ends up being, it’s probably going to be something else.”

Read More in Politico

Apple, Google, California Rebuffing Trump Over Climate Deal

Some companies and states are working to uphold the Paris climate accord, from which President Trump announced a U.S. departure last week. But, as is often the case, conservative state legislatures can easily undo measures taken at the city and county level, says Megan Mullin, a professor of environmental politics and policy. “Depending on the type of activity, a conservative state that is hostile to the idea of climate change action could clamp down on a city’s flexibility to engage in these activities,” says Mullin.

Read More in Vox

The Paris Agreement, Climate Change, NC Coast

“President Donald Trump’s withdrawal from the Paris Agreement may have serious consequences for North Carolina and our precious coast. In his withdrawal speech, he made no reference to the fact that the Paris Agreement is the first global step in the direction of slowing down the sea-level rise,” writes
Orrin Pilkey, professor emeritus at the Nicholas School of the Environment.

Read More in The News & Observer

Trump’s Decision on Paris Climate Change Agreement

Energy expert Brian Murray joins a panel to discuss the president’s decision to pull the United States out of the agreement.  Murray says the move means the world’s second-largest emitter of greenhouse gases is stepping away from the international process to address emissions over the next several decades, and that the responsibility will now fall on other nations.  (starts at 8:25 mark)

Watch More on “Capital Tonight”

Reactions To Trump’s Climate Accord Decision

“The notion that this change in policy will somehow resurrect the coal mine sector is a little bit hard to fathom,” says Brian Murray, interim director of Duke’s Energy Initiative. “Coal mining is subject to market forces that reduced employment significantly over the last several decades.”

Watch More on ABC11

 

 

Could ISIS Have Been Averted? US Not to Blame

“The United States is not to blame for the rise of the Islamic State. Nor is the United States all-powerful, capable of preventing any evil in the world. Far from it. But different U.S. policies might have better positioned it in the fight against the Islamic State,” writes political scientist Peter Feaver.

Read More in Foreign Policy

Takeaways From A Possible US Exit Of Paris Climate Accord

Being a part of Paris Accord discussions is so important that it’s spurred many companies across a broad array of U.S. sectors to advocate for staying in the agreement, says Brian Murray, director of the Environmental Economics Program at the Nicholas Institute for Environmental Policy Solutions. “You want the U.S. at the negotiating table,” Murray says. “These are companies that operate in most of those countries anyway, so they’re going to be living with the Paris agreement with or without the United States in it.”

Read More at Law 360